Category: Tasmania

State News: Tasmania


Small mining town pins hopes on tourism

Editorial

Government has long known that after the mining boom comes the dining boom. As our resources sector drops, services (like dining, arts and attractions) are flourishing. After their town’s 120 year-old mine closed, the optimistic locals of Queenstown Tasmania have embraced the practicality of tourism over mining as their main source of income. With a heritage railway going strong, a Railway Hotel revival and some passionate locals, the townspeople are confident their heritage product will soon be an attraction on par with Port Arthur and Cradle Mountain. Continue reading

Only 5 ‘fire-fit’ staff for 5000 visitors a day

Editorial

Community & Public Sector state union secretary for Tasmania Tom Lynch (pictured) has taken issue with the numbers of Tasmanian National Park staff ready to deal with bushfires. The government denies the under-resourcing of parks staff, but closes the biggest parks to the public on total fire ban days. Continue reading

Framework allows for secret developments

Editorial

Hobart’s prized former Treasury building (pictured) appears to be the first development to come to fruition in Tasmania after a much-supported ‘unsolicited proposal’ framework was implemented in the state. There’s just one catch for the public – if the project is an unsolicited proposal, the framework says planning can remain secret. Continue reading

Everyone but industry wins in high-roller deals

Editorial

MONA’s David Walsh, famed for making money of pokies but then using his powers for good to create arguably Australia’s best art facility, applied for a gambling licence then withdrew it. No big deal, right? Except that just the review of the licence cost the taxpayers of Tasmania $125,000, somehow pocketed by Sydney auditing firm Deloitte. Walsh demonstrates a thorough understanding of the effects of gambling on society, and MONA’s contribution to the Tasmanian/Australian art scene is unquestionable – but the government doesn’t appear accountable for the peripheral costs incurred. Continue reading

Liquor regulation not the answer: bands

Editorial

The Tasmanian Treasury is floating ideas on increasing liquor licensing fees in purported correlation with the cost of liquor regulation. Musicians and performers across the country though know what really stops violent behaviour – entertainment. Continue reading

Animal poisoning kept Mum by Tas department

Editorial

The Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment are under fire after the intentional poisoning of 5 Tasmanian devils and (incl a nursing mother) and three rare birds was kept on the quiet. As community awareness was not raised, the perpetrators couldn’t be found or punished. Continue reading

Vital attraction funding ‘lost’ between govs

Editorial

In a manner that has come to typify tourism funding, Tasmania’s Three Cape walk, whilst named a ‘hot new’ travel experience by Lonely Planet for 2015, will be $4m short before its planned opening later this year. Continue reading

Servo attendant raped at popular Big 4 van park

Editorial

The dark side of caravan parks has been highlighted by an incident in which a young woman working at a service station was abducted and raped in a popular Devonport Big4 tourist park. The caravan park is Big4’s offering nearest The Spirit of Tasmania. Continue reading

How planning battles cost the public

Editorial

The Tourism News gets a lot of questions about council planning processes. In this example, Hobart City Council has paid over $500,000 for a fairly obtuse walkway that won’t go ahead. After spending $188k in planning application and consultancy fees and $363k in court costs fighting the Battery Head residents, Hobart City Council’s General Manager is absconding from the actual costs to council. Continue reading

Hobart City Council get inordinately heritage-happy

Editorial

Hobart City Council have made a garish move by adding 1500 properties to their heritage register without the property owner’s knowledge. The listings would prevent many types of development of the properties and in many cases make the properties unsaleable. Even basic homes, like Dom Dinel’s pictured above, were added in what appears to be a strategic development line for the council/ state government. The Council could have succeeded in quietly treading on the rights of 1499 property owners – but only the The Federal Group – developers, casino operators, owners of the Wrest Point (inset) and major political players – are big enough to take the council to the Supreme Court over their property’s involuntary inclusion on the list. Continue reading

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